They Did What They Could Do

aquila priscilla

The churches of Asia greet you. Aquila and Priscilla greet you heartily in the Lord, with the church that is in their house. (1 Corinthians 16:19)

They Did What They Could Do

The First Century church was very different than the modern version of the Lord’s church in one particular way: it is not likely they had large and lavish building filled with soft pews, lighting and temperature control. As the first disciples began to learn to structure, organization and worship in the body of Christ, they had to find ways to carry out the work of the church. Assembling on the first day of the week was a command that had to be carried out but the means of bringing that about was left to the discretion of the brethren. Paul commends Aquila and Priscilla because of their diligent work for the Lord but also for allowing the church to assemble in their home. The apostle first met Aquila and Priscilla in Corinth after the Roman Emperor Claudius expelled the Jews from Rome. As fellow tent makers, Paul had a close relationship with the couple often encouraged by their faithful work in the kingdom.

It is not known the financial status of Aquila and Priscilla but they had a home they were willing to open allowing the church to assemble there. Probably not everyone could do this but this couple did what they were able to do so the work of the church could continue. There is a lot of work and effort to have the church in the home. For the Christian it is a joyous time to serve others. Going the extra mile to open the home to fellow brethren on a constant basis shows the love Aquila and Priscilla had for the Lord. They were blessed with a home where people could meet and they used that opportunity to help the church. Everyone could do what they could do to help one another and that is the great lesson. People like Dorcas whom Peter raised from the dead showed her faith by the many tunics and garments she made for others. The individual can do something for the Lord like Aquila and Priscilla and Dorcas.

Jesus taught His disciples the heart of a servant is what makes him stand out from others. The world is only interested in self but the child of God thinks of others and what he or she can do for the work of the kingdom. There may be some like Aquila and Priscilla that can open their homes to the work of the church while others may only be able to call and exhorting others to be strong in the Lord. Every Christian has something they can bring to the table. There is a lot of work to be done in the church like sending cards, visiting the sick and shut-in, calling those who need encouragement, having Bible studies in the home, inviting others to services, providing transportation, sharing food and clothing with the needy and a whole list of things that will build up the church. What we learn from Aquila and Priscilla is there is something for everyone to do. The value of the gift is not measured by the proportion of the effort but the intent of the heart. Little things are important as well as larger.

The best kind of work to be done is that which is done without being asked. It is not hard to find something to do when we look for it. There is a lot of work to be done in the church and with a servant’s heart, we will find things to do that will benefit the work of the church and let the light of Christ shine in the community. If you have an eldership, go and ask what you can do. Look for ways and means to build the work of the church up in doing what you can do. The body of Christ is made up of many members and every member is important. No one is unimportant. When everyone is doing all they can do (like Aquila and Priscilla) the church will grow in love and number and spirit. What a blessing the local church will experience when its borders are filled with those who have a heart to share their lives for others. Jesus reminds us this is how the world will know we are His disciples. Let’s get to work.

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