It Is Good To Ask For Advice

wisdomWithout counsel, plans go awry, but in the multitude of counselors, they are established. (Proverbs 15:22)

It Is Good To Ask For Advice

The book of Proverbs is a wonderful book of simple truths that if followed, will bring greater happiness in life. The proverbs are not deep religious discussions but bullets of common sense. The lost commodity of practical wisdom is found in the short, pithy sayings that speak volumes of interpersonal relationships, advice for the challenges of life and a complete relationship with God and man. We would do well to spend time combing the book of Proverbs for helping hints to improve our outlook in life. Seeking the counsel of others will give us greater understanding. Life is filled with making decisions. Trying to navigate the turbulent waters without the proper plans will not go well. The wise man suggests that to keep plans from failing, we should seek the counsel of those who can be trusted with practical wisdom. No man has all the answers to life. It is easy to believe we are right about everything but that is a failed assumption. Failure will always come to those who do not seek advice from others.

This proverb also suggests that we should make plans for life. We know the human experience is but a vapor but there should be a motivation to accomplish certain things in life. Making plans does not remove the reality there is no tomorrow. It determines a plan of wisdom in helping direct our lives to realize growth. We should never be satisfied with what we have done today as if there is nothing more to do. Spiritual growth continues to need planning and choosing the right path. Seeking the counsel of others helps to mold our decisions to make goals that can be accomplished. Asking advice will help further those goals to reality. The multitude of counselors will give a broader plane of wisdom to work from – guiding our decisions to a better end.

Seeking the counsel of others wards off the temptation of being rash. One of the problems of life is when we make hasty decisions without thinking the situation through. It is ‘in the moment’ we believe we know what is best and refuse to stop and seek a wiser head for guidance. Calamity follows. We say something that is regretted, act in a manner that is difficult to repair and all because we did not stop, think and listen to someone else. The ‘multitude of counselors’ would have warned us not to go down that path but we did not ask. We are all guilty. Sometimes we make unwise decisions that will last a lifetime. Regrets are made because we did not listen to the advice of others. Lessons learned the hard way are difficult to accept.

Rehoboam, son of Solomon, became king following his father’s death. He did not read the proverbs and heed their warnings. He sought after counsel but he chose the wrong kind of counsel beginning a long, spiraling death of the kingdom of Israel. In contrast, James writes in his epistle that older men and women should be teaching younger men and women. The implication also says that younger men and women should be seeking the counsel of older men and women. Listening to their advice will bring greater satisfaction in life than refusing counsel. Communication is a practical tool for wisdom. Without the counsel of others, plans will not work out for the best. Asking the advice of others will create a smoother path to journey in the uneven walks of life.

Do not be afraid to seek advice, asking guidance for the plans of life. Let the multitude of counselors be your best friends. Rash decisions will lead to trouble. Be patient in spirit. The word of God will be your foundation in seeking the counsel of the righteous. Surround your life with those who care for you and your journey to heaven. Listen, heed and guide the steps of your journey along the path of righteousness with those who walk before you. Imitate them as they imitate Christ.

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